Spring 2018 Classes for the Village Earth/CSU Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

Acquire the skills needed to transform your community and advance your career. This online certificate program is designed for people who currently work in community development and desire to advance their careers as well as those who plan to work or volunteer in this field. You will be equipped with practical tools to meet today’s challenges as project directors, community leaders, grassroots activists, funders, and field workers in community-based organizations and governmental and nongovernmental organizations. With a wide variety of electives, you can tailor the program to meet your needs and interests.To earn the certificate, you must complete the required courses of your chosen track and any elective courses of your choosing.  Each course runs five weeks and requires a minimum of 20 hours of student participation.  You may take courses in any order.

Don’t miss out! Registration deadline is February 27th, 2018!

COURSENEXT OFFERED
Approaches to Sustainable Community DevelopmentMarch 2nd, 2018
Technology and Community DevelopmentMarch 2nd, 2018
Building Climate Change Resilient CommunitiesMarch 2nd, 2018
Community MobilizationMarch 2nd, 2018

Students can enroll in just one course or complete all four courses at Colorado State University to receive a Certificate in Sustainable Community Development.  We also offer specialized tracks for those who would like their certificate program to focus in on a particular subject area within the field of sustainable community development.

The Aftermath of Harvey, Irma, Jose, Maria Demonstrate that Resilience Building is Now More Necessary than Ever

Photo: John Towner on Unsplash

By Luminita Cuna

An unusual active season I: water and wind

Harvey, Irma, Jose, Maria. And you can add Franklin, Gert, Katia, Lee, Nate, Ophelia. Ten hurricanes in ten weeks. This was the summer and fall of 2017.

Houston, Puerto Rico, Barbuda, Dominica, Antigua, St. Bart, St. Maarten. Places devastated, people with lost homes and livelihoods. Barbuda, the whole island, was completely destroyed and so was 95% of Dominica. What really stood out this year was the intensity, frequency and duration of these storms. And they signal what may be the new normal for the future.

Although hurricanes are very complex phenomena and the link between them and climate change is not a simple one to show, scientists agree that the consequences of our changing climate definitely made these powerful storms worse: warmer ocean surface both in temperature and in the number of days increased the intensity of the storms and rising sea levels affected the storm surge. There were other factors that came together to form literally, the perfect storms: the small difference in wind speed at the surface which kept the hurricanes in place for longer, the strong west African monsoons and a neutral El Niño.

The human factor contributed as well to the impact these storms had on human population, like the construction boom in Houston that destroyed the wetlands that were once a natural barrier to flood waters. An important ecosystem was destroyed, decreasing the resilience of the land and leaving the people of Houston vulnerable.

It is clear that resilience building is more necessary that ever in all the areas prone to such climate events. The Building Climate Change Resilient Communities class we explore how to build resilience in social and ecological systems, and will provide an insight in conducting resilience assessments of both ecosystems and communities.

 

Working Equids (Donkeys, Mules and Horses) Driving Sustainable Livelihoods


Village Earth helps reconnect communities to the resources that promote human well-being by enhancing social and political empowerment, community self-reliance and self-determination. We do this by strengthening intermediate and grassroots organizations through fiscal sponsorship, networking, training, research and advocacy. Since our founding in 1993 a central pillar of our research and advocacy mission has been the promotion of appropriate technologies. We would like to thank Angela Varnum for contributing the following post that recognizes the large and important role that working equids (donkeys, mules and horses) play in the livelihoods of people around the globe as a form of “appropriate technology” that contributes to a more sustainable agroecological system.


by Angela Varnum

Donkey awaiting the next chore in Mexico – Photo: Angela Varnum

A secret to development may be hiding behind a set of ears.

And a big set of ears, at that. The donkey, mule, and their traditional counterpart of course, the horse, play an integral role in sustaining global human livelihoods. Contrary to the horse’s primary role as a recreational vehicle in the U.S., the trifecta species (horses, donkeys, and mules) which make up working equids are, quite literally, the world’s tractors, pickup trucks, and all-terrain vehicles.

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Mule and donkey train outside Collpapampa, Peru

Photo: Angela Varnum

Though working equids fuel much of the world, you may not have heard of them before. It’s not because they’re not present – globally, there are approximately 112 million working equids1. That means 95% of the world’s donkeys and 60% of the world’s horses are used for work2,3. Though ubiquitous, working equids endure a sort of personality crisis. Neither traditional livestock used for meat and fiber, such as cattle and sheep, nor pets classified as companion animals, donkeys, mules, and horses have historically just not “fit.” Working equids have just recently begun to receive global attention and policy considerations4.

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Milk delivery donkey in Ursulo Galván, Veracruz, Mexico – Photo: Angela Varnum

It would be easy to dismiss their pitied pack animal role as quietly fading in light of global modernization. After all, doesn’t the lowly donkey represent under-development? Not at all. The population of working equids is stable – and in some areas growing. World donkey and mule populations are steadily climbing, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and the Indian sub-continent5.

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Horses and mules transport tourist supplies near Salkantay, Peru – Photo: Angela Varnum

In the field of sustainable development, where renewable resources and climate-smart technologies are buzzing, it may be worth turning an ear toward working equids. These herbivorous livestock generate natural fertilizer, are a source of renewable energy, and can work in conditions which may not be accessible to motorized vehicles, such as steep terrain 6. All this in addition to their relative affordability (in most areas) as compared to motorized vehicles. It has been estimated that 400 million draught (working) animals may save as many as 20 million tons of petroleum per year through their contributions to agricultural production7. As 85% of farmers in developing countries work on less than two hectares of land8, it is fortunate that working equids can graze marginally-productive agricultural land and be simultaneously used for hauling tourists or rented out to other families9,10. “Equids are more and more playing an increasing role in the new context of sustainable development.”11

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Donkey in Colipa, Mexico – Photo: Angela Varnum

A recent study found that working equids remain useful in an Andean region of Peru because they diversify income. One’s mules, perhaps traditionally used to carry harvests of potatoes and corn from the fields to the home, can be used in other ways. Even as extremely low rainfall threatens the agricultural harvest, these same mules are harnessed – literally – to carry tourists up and down the scenic mountains, earning a more predictable income for its family. As one owner shared, “Not even a kilo, I didn’t harvest anything… and that’s why we have a big help which are these mules…”10. The situation in Peru echoes that in arid regions in African countries, where donkeys can lessen the effects of decreased agricultural productivity5.

The kicker? The maintenance of working equids can be just as important, and intensive, as that of a car, truck, or tractor. Extending the useful lifetime of an equid by keeping it healthy can mean greater financial efficiency. As new uses of working equines beget new management systems, traditional knowledge that has guided animal husbandry for millennia can be supplemented with new research.

As part of an organization called the Equitarian Initiative, veterinarians, equine scientists, nutritionists, farriers, behaviorists, and other volunteers offer services to support the working equids of the world. Their expertise bridges aspects such as equine surgery, internal medicine, dentistry, lameness, preventive medicine, farrier care, public health, and education. The Equitarian Initiative works to engage with communities by hiring local community members, conducting in-country educational programs, and partnering with local veterinarians and veterinary schools. More information about this organization can be found at www.equitarianinitiative.org.

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Equitarians oversee a surgery patient in Costa Rica – Photo: Angela Varnum

Contact Angela Varnum at atgebhart@gmail.com

  1. GLiPHA (Global Livestock Production and Health Atlas). (2013). Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Animal Production and Health Division). Retrieved from http://kids.fao.org/glipha/.
  2. Starkey, P. & Starkey, M. (2004). Regional and world trends in donkey populations. In D. Fielding & P. Starkey (Eds.), Donkeys, People and Development: A Resource Book of the Animal Traction Network for Eastern and Southern Africa (ATNESA), 10-21.
  3. Fielding, D. (1991). The number and distribution of equines in the world. In Proceedings of the Colloquium on Donkeys, Mules and Horses in Tropical Agricultural Development, Edinburgh, 3–6 September, 62–66.
  4. Welfare of Working Equids. (2017). In OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. Retrieved from http://www.oie.int/fileadmin/Home/eng/Health_standards/tahc/current/chapitre_aw_working_equids.pdf.
  5. Fernando, P. & Starkey, M. (2004). Donkeys and development: socio-economic aspects of donkey use in Africa. In D. Fielding & P. Starkey (Eds.), Donkeys, People and Development: A Resource Book of the Animal Traction Network for Eastern and Southern Africa (ATNESA), 31-44.
  6. Arriaga-Jordán, C.M., Colunga-González B., Velázquez-Beltrán L.G. (2006). The Contributions of Working Equines to Sustainable Rural Livelihoods. In Proceedings of Fifth International Colloquium on Working Equines, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 264-275.
  7. Ramaswamy, N.S. (2010). – Draught animal power systems. In Cartman Special Issue, Centre for Animals and Environment, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India.
  8. European Commission (2010). An EU policy framework to assist developing countries in addressing food security challenges. Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament COM 127:5.
  9. Pearson, R.A., et al. (ed.) (2003). Working Animals in Agriculture and Transport: In A Collection of Some Current Research and Development Observations. EAAP Technical Series No. 6. Wageningen Academic Publishers: The Netherlands.
  10. Varnum, A.T. (2017). Working Equid Use for Sustainable Development. Master’s Thesis, Colorado School of Public Health, Fort Collins, CO.
  11. Miraglia, N. (2012). Equids contribution to sustainable development in rural areas: a new challenge for the third millennium. In Forages and Grazing in Horse Nutrition. EAAP Publication No. 132. Wageningen Academic Publishers: the Netherlands.

January 2018 Courses in the Village Earth/CSU Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

Acquire the skills needed to transform your community and advance your career. This online certificate program is designed for people who currently work in community development and desire to advance their careers as well as those who plan to work or volunteer in this field. You will be equipped with practical tools to meet today’s challenges as project directors, community leaders, grassroots activists, funders, and field workers in community-based organizations and governmental and nongovernmental organizations. With a wide variety of electives, you can tailor the program to meet your needs and interests.To earn the certificate, you must complete the required courses of your chosen track and any elective courses of your choosing.  Each course runs five weeks and requires a minimum of 20 hours of student participation.  You may take courses in any order.  Each course costs $390.


Students can enroll in just one course or complete all four courses at Colorado State University to receive a Certificate in Sustainable Community Development.  We also offer specialized tracks for those who would like their certificate program to focus in on a particular subject area within the field of sustainable community development. Ask us about group discounts for NGO’s, Governments and Organizations – contact david@villageearth.org

Courses Starting January 12th, 2018.

PARTICIPATORY MONITORING & EVALUATION

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units: 2
Duration: 5 weeks

Next OfferedDeadline to RegisterRegistration StatusOffered By 
January 12 - February 16, 2018January 12, 2018Open
April 20th - May 5, 2018April 2, 2018Open

Course Description

Discover participatory methods in monitoring and evaluation for community development, where multiple stakeholders are involved in the process of planning, collecting, interpreting, communicating, and using information. Gain skills in using regular monitoring and evaluation processes, which will lead to continuous improvements.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Plan a monitoring and evaluation project
  • Develop evaluation questions that address stakeholders needs
  • Select the most appropriate data collection method for a given situation
  • Effectively communicate monitoring and evaluation data
  • Use the monitoring information for effective feedback and improvement

COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEU’s): 2
Duration: 5 Weeks

Next OfferedDeadline to RegisterRegistration StatusOffered By 
January 12 - February 16, 2018January 12, 2018Open

Course Description

Access to health care and other resources, such as nutritious foods, employment, clean water, safe housing, education, etc. are crucial to maintaining health and well-being.  In an ideal world, everyone would have access to these essential means for survival, however, it is all too apparent that this is not the case for many communities and populations around the world.  It is desirable, therefore, for those groups who are not supported by a formal health care system to seek alternative solutions for the resources they lack.  Using case studies and other readings, along with group discussion, this course will explore the global, social, political, economic, and cultural factors that contribute to poor health.  It will also look at methods for empowering communities who lack access to health care to create practical solutions that are relevant to their unique situations.  Community-Based Participatory Research will be one of the key strategies dealt with in this course due to its focus on promoting change at the grass roots level.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify micro and macro level factors that affect health and well-being.
  • Collaborate with communities to evaluate their needs in regard to health and cultivate ideas for appropriate actions to address those needs.
  • Provide support for community-based solutions to health issues by establishing connections to information and resources.

DEVELOPMENT AND THE POLITICS OF EMPOWERMENT

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEU’s): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

Next OfferedDeadline to RegisterRegistration StatusOffered By 
January 12th – February 16th, 2018January 12, 2018Open

Course Description

“…development is a process of empowerment.”
–Edwards, The Irrelevance of Development Studies

Over the last few decades, many scholars have begun to challenge traditional conceptions of development. Their work has generated an intense debate between those that attribute “underdevelopment” to cultural factors, and those that dismiss such ideas as racially motivated and instead recognize poverty and marginalization as primarily structural and systemic issues. Indeed, the concept of poverty itself has been challenged. Employing this critical lens, the course will examine the assertion that development should not only be seen as an economic process of wealth accumulation, but rather as a socio-political process of empowerment. This realization has major implications for how NGOs approach development, as it brings to light the fact that this work has a substantial political component. In order to overcome the disadvantages of poverty, structural barriers to success must be addressed. Through a careful investigation of the historical applications of development, we will explore the idea that development is an inherently political process and challenge the claim that any development NGO is apolitical. Additionally, we will strive to identify successful methods of community empowerment through political organization.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Analyze the underlying political implications and perspectives of seemingly apolitical actions in development work
  • Apply and refine techniques of empowerment and advocacy
  • Explain the history of development thinking as it relates to politics
  • Articulate a broader understanding of key terms, such as empowerment, participation, politics, and power

 

Fall 2017 Project Report for MILA YATAN PIKA PTE OYATE OKOLAKICIYE (Knife Chief Buffalo Nation)

This report covers the Fall season of 2017. Mila Yatan Pika Pte Oyate Okolakiciye (Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Society) continues to provide a pasture/home for members of the Pte Oyate (Buffalo Nation) and the community continues to reap the benefits in terms of spiritual nurturing through their teachings and physical nourishment from them. Here’s a summary of our activities for this period.

Koskalaka Wicayuwita Pi (Young Men’s Gathering) Cultural Camp
November 9-13, 2017

Tipis Young Men’s Camp Nov 2017 Porcupine SD

Mila Yatan Pika Pte Oyate Okolakiciye (Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Organization partnered with the Tasunke Wakan Okolakiciye on a cultural camp for boys and young men on November 9-13, 2013.. Knife Chief Buffalo Nation Society board member Richard Two Dogs and Gene Giago, Elder of the Tasunke Wakan Okolakiciye (Medicine Horse) led the planning and implementation of this effort, with the help of male relatives volunteers, the event was a huge success! The age group was age 12–17 and there were 12 boys that participated.

The focus on the camp was on the Lakota traditional teachings on becoming a man. The importance of Lakota kinship, protecting the people and providing for the people were major themes.

Figure 2 Boys and Young Men’s Camp, Porcupine, SD Nov 2017

The boys and young men were also taught how to hunt in a safe and respectful manner emphasizing that the deer and buffalo that were hunted also have a spirit and that an offering be made when taking their lives.

Wopila tanka (a big thank you in the Lakota Language) to all the volunteers for the camp including Richard Two Dogs, Gene Giago, Joe Giago, Richard Giago, Mac McFarland, Santee Baird, Matthew Shoulders, Eugene Giago Jr., Stan Holder Jr., Randi Boucher Giago, and Hail Baird. A big thank you to Mark Butterbrodt, Linda Two Bulls, Michelle Curry, Cindy Giago, Gene Tyon Jr., Jennifer Tomac, Colleen Ragan and Chris Eagle Hawk for their part in making this camp a success. Appreciation goes to Elton Yellow Boy for providing the first aid/cpr training for the volunteers. There may be someone we’ve not included, it was not intentional!


Spiritual Calendar Observance – Pte Ta Tiopa – (Doorway to the Black Hills for the Buffalo), October 21, 2017

The Lakota people follow a spiritual calendar in which offerings of natural tobacco and spiritual food are made when the sun passes through a particular constellation throughout the year. On October 21, 2017, offerings were made in observance of when the traditional time the buffalo returned to the sacred Black Hills. The next offerings will be made on December 21, 2017 for the Wanicokan (mid-Winter) ceremony which marks the beginning of the time to prepare for the Spring and Summer ceremonies, including gathering red willow branches to prepare to make the natural tobacco used in the ceremonies.


Star in Quilt Represents Relationship between Lakota people and Star Nation

Preparing a New Pasture for the Buffalo Relatives

Unloading posts for buffalo fence, Porcupine SD

In the Spring of 2017, we began preparing a new home for the buffalo relatives which involves fencing nearly 5 miles and installing a solar powered well for their water source. We had help from Jeremy Langdeaux, Jeremy Glasgow, Tekuani, Donavon Thunder Hawk, Jr., William Locke, Adrian Yellow Boy, James Bush, Richard Two Dogs, Ed Iron Cloud III (who heads up the project), Bob Iron Cloud, Jeff Iron Cloud, Lucille Contreras to name several. This is an ongoing project due to the financial expense. We thank our supporters for the ongoing quest to make the new home for the buffalo a reality.

Closing

We extend a heartfelt appreciation to the people and organizations, including Hopa Mountain, Oglala Sioux Parks and Recreation Authority, Natural Native Foods, Tanka Fund, Connie from Germany to name a few, who have supported our efforts whether financially, physically or spiritually. Your support is truly appreciated, and we especially appreciate the Tunkasila (spiritual entities) for their continued support and guidance. We also acknowledge the Pte Oyate (Buffalo Nation) for what they inspire in us and their teachings – protection of the young, conservation of the land and the strength and fortitude to endure whatever comes. Lila Wopila Tanka!! (We thank you all very much).

Let us know if you have any questions, we are very interested in hearing from you! We are an affiliate of Village Earth Inc. and thank Dave Bartecchi, Executive Director for all his assistance, //landing.villageearth.org/global-affiliates/knife-chief-buffalo-nation-2.

CONTACT INFORMATION

For more information, contact us at:

Email: knifechiefbuffalonation@gmail.com

Telephone: 605-515-4667 or 605-899-9336

Village Earth Remembers John Ragnar Long – August 23, 1973 – November 20, 2017

The late Dr. Edwin F. Shinn (left) and John R. Long (right)

Village Earth honors the passing of another member of our family, John R. Long who, after a long and spirited battle, succumbed to cancer November 20th, 2017. John first joined Village Earth as a volunteer starting in 1999. As a volunteer, John engaged Village Earth as a sponsor of the second annual Rocky Mountain Sustainable Living Fair which served as an annual focal point for the local sustainability community and showcased sustainable technologies and projects from around the world. The first fair was organized by Students at Colorado State University. After that time, the fair would be organized by the Rocky Mountain Sustainable Living Association each year until 2015. In 2000 John completed Village Earth’s flagship in-person training “Participatory Practices for Sustainable Development (PPSD). Connections made during this training lead John to spearhead a partnership between Village Earth and the International Rescue Committee on a large-scale cluster development program in the southern region of Azerbaijan from 2001 to 2003. John worked diligently as Village Earth’s director of development but was clearly more comfortable ‘out in the community’ working on the Sustainable Living Fair or innovating in the burgeoning biofuels market, eventually co-founding Blue Sun Biodiesel Fuels and other sustainability focused organizations like Zero Hero, Fat Pig Society, and Biodiesel for Bands. John was a true leader who inspired others and supported the growth and development of those around him. He was a major catalyst for change in the Fort Collins community and beyond and we all feel a deep sense of loss with his passing but his legacy and spirit lives on through all the people he inspired and all the institutions he helped to form!

Donate to Village Earth this Holiday Season and Support Grassroots Organizations in 15 Countries

It’s the most important time of the year for generating support for Village Earth’s 20 Global Affiliates in 15 different countries. We need your help to reach our goal of raising $30,000 in support of our Global Affiliate Program. Help us flip the traditional aid model on its head by putting local organizations and local solutions at the forefront. Village Earth helps connect you to innovative, impactful organizations working on the front-lines of social and environmental justice around the globe. Make a difference today by making your holiday gift to one of our Global Affiliates listed below.

Also, don’t forget to encourage your friends and family to also make a donation to Village Earth and help us get the word out by liking and sharing us on social media (bottom of page).

Global Affiliates

BurundiAmahoro Project
CambodiaCambodian Rural Development Team
Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota USAEarth Tipi
SriEco-Friendly Volunteers
CambodiaEmpowering Youth Cambodia
South SudanForum for Community Change and Development
MongoliaGer Community Mapping Center
LiberiaGrowing Liberia Democracy (GOLD)
NepalInstitute of Cultural Affairs (Nepal)
CambodiaHuman and Hope Association
TheJalamba Nursery School Project
ColombiaJenzera
Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota USAKnife Chief Buffalo Nation
Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota USALakota Buffalo Caretakers Cooperative
Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota USALakota Lands Recovery Project
MexicoLiving Roots
Amazon BasinMaloca
BoliviaRio Beni Foundation
IndiaSarada Development Group
Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota USATasunke Wakan
ZambiaTitukuke RCDA

Winter 2018 Classes for the Village Earth/CSU Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

Acquire the skills needed to transform your community and advance your career. This online certificate program is designed for people who currently work in community development and desire to advance their careers as well as those who plan to work or volunteer in this field. You will be equipped with practical tools to meet today’s challenges as project directors, community leaders, grassroots activists, funders, and field workers in community-based organizations and governmental and nongovernmental organizations. With a wide variety of electives, you can tailor the program to meet your needs and interests.To earn the certificate, you must complete the required courses of your chosen track and any elective courses of your choosing.  Each course runs five weeks and requires a minimum of 20 hours of student participation.  You may take courses in any order.

Don’t miss out! Registration deadline is January 12th, 2018!

COURSENEXT OFFERED
Approaches to Sustainable Community DevelopmentMarch 2nd, 2018
Technology and Community DevelopmentMarch 2nd, 2018
Building Climate Change Resilient CommunitiesMarch 2nd, 2018
Community MobilizationMarch 2nd, 2018

Students can enroll in just one course or complete all four courses at Colorado State University to receive a Certificate in Sustainable Community Development.  We also offer specialized tracks for those who would like their certificate program to focus in on a particular subject area within the field of sustainable community development.

Village Earth Welcomes Our Newest Affiliate “Ger Community Mapping Center” in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Village Earth is happy to announce the newest member of our Global Affiliate Program “Ger Community Mapping Center” based in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Ger Community Mapping Center (GCMC) is a non – governmental organization dedicated to sustainable, equal access urban development through community engagement and participatory decision-making. The GCMC, formerly a community group named Eco Friendly Community, has been doing community mapping activities in the ger areas since 2012.

Ger promotes community mapping as a planning, awareness and outreach tool to advocate for sustainable, participatory and eco-friendly solutions to address local urban problems.​​ ​​​The central focus of their work is to engage local communities in discussions about issues they face in their local environment. As a former community group, they know how to reach out to and involve community members and do this by facilitating discussions with community members through community workshops, street meetings and gatherings. At these discussions they collectively identify issues, solutions and the next steps to improve these people’s communities.

We encourage you to follow Ger Community Mapping Project on Facebook and Twitter.

Village Earth is proud to represent and support so many amazing organizations around the globe.  These organizations understand the challenges in their own community and environment, and can generate creative solutions.  They often, however, need additional support to gain greater control over the decisions and resources that shape their lives, whether it’s cleaner water, protected land, thriving enterprises or better access to healthcare and education. Your donation to any of Village Earth’s Global Affiliates is tax-deductible to the extent allowable by U.S. law.

 

2018 Course Schedule for VE/CSU online certificate program in Sustainable Community Development

2018 Course Schedule for the Village Earth/CSU Online Program in Sustainable Community Development

The Village Earth/Colorado State University online certificate program in Sustainable Community Development is designed for people who currently work in community development and desire to advance their careers as well as those who plan to work or volunteer in this field. You will be equipped with practical tools to meet today’s challenges as project directors, community leaders, grassroots activists, funders, and field workers in community-based organizations and governmental and nongovernmental organizations. With a wide variety of electives, you can tailor the program to meet your needs and interests.To earn the certificate, you must complete the required courses of your chosen track and any elective courses of your choosing.  Each course runs five weeks and requires a minimum of 20 hours of student participation.  You may take courses in any order.  Each course costs $390.

Winter Session: January 12th – February 16th, 2018

Spring Session I: March 2nd – April 6th, 2018

Spring Session II: April 20th – May 5th, 2018

Summer Session I: June 8th – July 13th, 2018

Summer Session II: July 27th – August 31st, 2018

Fall Session I: September 14th – October 19th, 2018

Winter Session I: November 2nd – December 7th, 2018

 

*Schedule Subject to Change