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The most comprehensive, compact, and cost effective appropriate technology and sustainable living resource in the world! The AT Library contains the full text and images from over 1050 of the best books dealing with all areas of self-reliance, do-it-yourself technology – over 150,000 pages! Portable and easy to use on 1 USB, 2 DVDs or 28 CDs. The AT Library is currently in use in over 74 countries worldwide.


Above: Just a handful of the literally thousands of detailed
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– Lance & Debra Sprick, Life Resource Foundation, Iligan City, Philippines

 

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Lakota Lands Recover Project Develops Searchable Allotment Map for Members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe

Village Earth’s Lakota Lands Recovery Project is excited to announce the release of our latest mapping project, the merging of the original allotment maps with the contemporary parcel map for the entire Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota and was realized with support from the Indian Land Tenure Foundation. This updates the current parcel map on the Pine Ridge Land Information System (PRLIS) accessible at http://lakotalands.net/ and makes it possible to locate the original allotments by entering a surname into the search form. Alternatively, one can identify the original allottee of any parcel by hovering over it with their mouse and clicking on it which opens a pop-up information window (see image below). This project entailed the manual entry of data for 20,584 separate parcels. 

Summary of the Data

  • Total Unique Parcels = 20,584
  • Total Allotted Parcels = 16,762
  • Total Un-Allotted Parcels = 2,739
  • Total Number of Unique Surnames = 2,229

The creation of allotments was part of the General Allotment Act, also known as the Dawes Severalty Act of 1887. The creation and issuing of allotments began on the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1904, under Executive Order of July 29, 1904 and continued until 1923. During this period, government officials carved up the Reservation into parcels and issued them to Lakota families. United States policy towards Native Americans during the first part of the century was focused on the cultural and economic assimilation of Native Americans into the majority culture. Furthermore there was a great deal of pressure to open up Indian lands to white settlers. “By the 1880’s settlers had filed upon most of the arable land in the West under the Homestead Act and other federal statutes. Indian reservation land then, in a sense, comprised the agrarians’ last frontier” (Gibson, 1988: p 227). Furthermore, the practice of communally managed lands by tribes was viewed as a non-productive and irrational use of resources. To address these interests, in 1887 the U.S. congress passed General Allotment Act (GAA) also known as the Dawes Severalty Act. The purpose of the act was to liquidate Indian land holdings by dividing the land up into 160-acre allotments to heads of households. After all the allotments were issued remaining lands in the West, which totaled over 60,000,000 acres, was opened up to homesteaders (Gibson, 1988).

Click here to access the Pine Ridge Land Information System

Special thanks goes out to Subashini Subbaiah, Emma Giles, Bryanna Gilbert, Alex Dierker, Steven Spence, Rachel Stevenson for their help on this project.

 

 

Autumn 2017 Classes for the Village Earth/CSU Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

Acquire the skills needed to transform your community and advance your career. This online certificate program is designed for people who currently work in community development and desire to advance their careers as well as those who plan to work or volunteer in this field. You will be equipped with practical tools to meet today’s challenges as project directors, community leaders, grassroots activists, funders, and field workers in community-based organizations and governmental and nongovernmental organizations. With a wide variety of electives, you can tailor the program to meet your needs and interests.To earn the certificate, you must complete the required courses of your chosen track and any elective courses of your choosing.  Each course runs five weeks and requires a minimum of 20 hours of student participation.  You may take courses in any order.

Don’t miss out! Registration deadline is October 30th, 2017!

COURSENEXT OFFERED
Approaches to Sustainable Community DevelopmentMarch 2nd, 2018
Technology and Community DevelopmentMarch 2nd, 2018
Building Climate Change Resilient CommunitiesMarch 2nd, 2018
Community MobilizationMarch 2nd, 2018

Students can enroll in just one course or complete all four courses at Colorado State University to receive a Certificate in Sustainable Community Development.  We also offer specialized tracks for those who would like their certificate program to focus in on a particular subject area within the field of sustainable community development.

Fall 2017 Classes for the Village Earth/CSU Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

Acquire the skills needed to transform your community and advance your career. This online certificate program is designed for people who currently work in community development and desire to advance their careers as well as those who plan to work or volunteer in this field. You will be equipped with practical tools to meet today’s challenges as project directors, community leaders, grassroots activists, funders, and field workers in community-based organizations and governmental and nongovernmental organizations. With a wide variety of electives, you can tailor the program to meet your needs and interests.To earn the certificate, you must complete the required courses of your chosen track and any elective courses of your choosing.  Each course runs five weeks and requires a minimum of 20 hours of student participation.  You may take courses in any order.

Don’t miss out! Registration deadline is September 11th, 2017!

COURSENEXT OFFERED
Approaches to Sustainable Community DevelopmentMarch 2nd, 2018
Technology and Community DevelopmentMarch 2nd, 2018
Building Climate Change Resilient CommunitiesMarch 2nd, 2018
Community MobilizationMarch 2nd, 2018

Students can enroll in just one course or complete all four courses at Colorado State University to receive a Certificate in Sustainable Community Development.  We also offer specialized tracks for those who would like their certificate program to focus in on a particular subject area within the field of sustainable community development.

Village Earth is Looking for a GIS/Data Analysis Intern in the Fort Collins, Colorado Area

Village Earth is looking for a GIS/Data Entry and Analysis Intern in the Fort Collins, Colorado area to assist with new and ongoing research and advocacy projects with Native American communities. This is an unpaid internship but may turn into a paid position. Interns will be expected to commit 10hrs per week under close supervision and training from existing Village Earth staff. Interns could work from home or at the Village Earth offices at Colorado State University’s foothills campus but must be available for regular (weekly) in-person meetings in Fort Collins, Colorado. Eligible applicants must have either completed academic courses in or have related experience with social research methods and GIS and be comfortable using ESRI ArcMap, QGIS, MS Excel/Libre Office Calc. Academic credit may be available but must be coordinated first with your academic adviser. This person (ideally) would start their internship immediately.

Interested applicants should send a resume and cover letter describing their experience and qualifications for this position to info@villageearth.org.

Learn About the Village Earth/CSU Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

Baseline Survey Report for VE Affiliate’s “GOLD” initiative to Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse in Liberia

Support this project at www.globalgiving.org

1.1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This Baseline Survey was part of a research methodology designed to help develop an effective strategy for the contextual problems that smallholder farmers have faced with farming for over the past 5 decades in the Gbeah’s Town, Gbor Clan, District 2B. The strategy will be used in the implementation of a project entitled: “Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse.” The survey successfully Identified 15 smallholder farmers, which are currently participating in our Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse program.1 The Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse project is the first Pilot project of Growing Liberia Democracy (GOLD), which focuses on promoting a sustainable community and quality governance in rural Grand Bassa County. The project is raising its pilot funding on the Global Giving platform, through an affiliation with Village Earth, of Bolder Colorado. However due to limited funding, the strategy initially focused only on building a sustainable community by organizing and developing a group of 15 smallholder farmers and creating a management team to establish the Rural Early Learning Program (RELEP) for inhabitants in Gbeah’s Town and it surrounding villages; the community is located in the Gbor clan, District 2B, Grand Bassa County.

The purpose of the survey was to identify basic challenges and recommended solutions to those challenges, as a measure the next generation of the Gbor Clan age smallholder farmers can use as tools to improve the farming environment for smallholder farmers in the Gbor Clan. The strategy we used in administering the survey is based on the traditional Gbor clan values and leadership principle and for group facilitation, advocacy, organizational leadership, and community mobilization. In accordance with these values, the survey process began on March 28, 2017 by training two local volunteers with the skills needed to conduct the survey. After the survey administrative training, the two local volunteers worked alongside GOLD staff to administer the survey; a process which took place from March to April 2017. The survey covered five villages including Gbeah’s Town, Jurkpans Town, Togas Town, John’s Town and, Darkinnah’s Town, soliciting the views of respondents in the community.

1.2 Purpose of the Baseline Survey

The Baseline Survey for the Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse Project was conducted to establish and better understand the contextual problems/challenges facing the next generation of smallholder farmers in Gbeah’s Town and its surrounding villages.

The survey was conducted to identify targeted smallholders farmers that are participating in Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse project.

1.3 The General Objective

The objective of the Baseline Survey is to establish an effective framework for the implementation of our Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse project.

1.4 Specific Objectives

This Baseline Survey set out with the following specific objectives:

  1. Identify 15 smallholder farmers that are participating in the Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse project in Gbeah’s Town and its surrounding villages.

  2. Establish an effective framework for the contextual farming condition of smallholder farmers in Gbeah’s Town and its surrounding village, Gbor Clan, Grand Bassa.

  3. Establish a sustainable model for sustainable cooperative faming that smallholder farmers in Gbeah’s Town its surrounding villages (Gbor Clan, Grand Bassa County.) can be passionate about.

1.5 Expected Outcome of the Baseline Survey

An established qualitative and quantitative gap analysis of farming in the Gbor Clan, District 2 and District 2B, Grand Bassa County.

2.0 Methodology & Administrative Process

The methodology involve in the baseline survey included the following:

  • Training two volunteer to administer a survey

  • Organizing a community meeting for the targeted smallholder farmers and community leaders for effective strategy development for the Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse project

  • Administering a one on one guided interview with smallholder farmers in Gbeah’s Town and its surrounding villages

2.0 Data Collection Procedure

This research design used the Descriptive (survey) research method to collect its data. The process of administering the survey proceeded in three steps. The first step was to identify the 15 farmers who would participate in the survey. To this end, GOLD gave community leaders the responsibility to identify list of 15 satisfied smallholder farmers during the first awareness meeting. The leadership selected five successful smallholder farmers from Gbeah’’s Town and 10 smallholder farmers from four villages surrounding Gbeah’s Town. The farmers identified by the communities by the community leaders were then convened in Gbeah’s Town where the survey was administered with help from the Crunch Back Consulting Firm2. The researchers used answers from respondents, to describe a set of observations from data collected. These data, and the conclusions which follow from them, are the subject of this report.

2.1 Team Composition

The administrative team for this project consisted of 4 members: two local volunteers from Gbeah’Town, a senior staff member from GOLD, and a supervisor from the Crunch Back Consulting firm. (Prior to the project, GOLD underwent specialized training by a researcher from Pittsburg University in the United States. Thereafter, GOLD proceeded to train the two local volunteers in various aspects of survey administration, in which the volunteers learned confidentiality, presentation, body communication and flexibility.

2.2 Time Frame of GOLD Baseline Survey

The baseline survey activities started April 26 and ended May 4, 2017.

Date

Activities

Location

Time (Local)

Participants

26/04/2017

Hosting first general meeting for the community

Gbheah’s Town

6:30pm-7:30pm

GOLD/Community members, women, farmers, Leaders and elders

28/04/2017

Survey Training Workshop

Gbeah’s Town

4:30pm-5:30pm

GOLD and two local volunteers

30/04/2017

Survey Administration

Gbeah’s Town

8:00am-10:00pm

GOLD team and smallholder farmers in Gbeah’s Towh

02/05/2017

Survey Administration

Gbeah’s Town

8:00am-10:pm

GOLD team and smallholder farmers in surrounded villages

02/05/2017

Second general Meeting

Gbeah’s Town

4:30pm-6:00pm

GOLD team, smallholder farmers, community leaders, elders and children

3/05/2017

Meeting with teachers

Gbeah’s Town

5:00pm-6:00pm

Two teachers and GOLD team

4/05/2017

Trip to the City

In the traffic

11:00am-4:00pm

GOLD senior researcher.

5/10/2017

Data processing, reporting, editing of reporting and presentation of report.

Crunch Back office in Monrovia

9:00am-4:pm

GOLD staff/ Research supervisor.

2.3 Budget

The Budget of this survey is two hundred United State Dollars ($200.00 USD), please find attached the budget in details for the baseline survey.

2.4 Findings of the Baseline Survey

T he survey result indicated that most of the potential smallholder farmers were working-age youth, with over 15 years of farming experience, but largely without any former agriculture training. This means that based on their long time experience in farming and age group, it is easy to improve smallholder farmers products; these smallholders farmers are young with much energy, and if supported with tools, training and good policy, can be a key point for inclusive growth and a sure way to lower inequality, increase their income and reduce poverty in the region.

The survey findings further indicated that while all the smallholder farmers identified through the survey were male; however, these smallholder farmers and their wives share equal responsibility with their spouses on their individual farm. This means that, the project will be impacting the lives of both 15 male and 15 female smallholder farmers throughout its activities, especially in the way of training.

The survey furthered indicated that majority of those families of farmers represented in this survey have no less than 5 children between the ages 4-15 years that are not in school. This means that, if the issue of early learning is not addressed, the children might end up being like many of the parent who are very poor and illiterate. Accordingly, the results of our survey suggest a significant likelihood that majority of the smallholder farmers in the region share similar challenges in the farming surroundings of the Gbor Clan.

According to the survey outcome, farmers in the region mainly farm pineapple and ginger, which means that we would need to find an expert agriculturist who will be able to train those smallholder farmers in modern methods for high yield and quality products to meet international standards for local and global market.

Based on this survey we can conclude that fa   rmers in the community have not received farming subsidies of any kind from the government since 1939, this means that farmers in the region will continue to use more effort with little yield if there is no policy to improve the lives of small holder farmers in the Gbor Clan. Without these necessary improvements, farmers will continue to practice the bush rotation system of shifting cultivation with manual hand labor, using ordinary agricultural tools such as cutlass, axe and hoe for very little yield.

The result further indicates that, the lack of effective leadership is one of the basic causal factors driving the current inadequacy of the community’s farming methods. This means that 1)smallholder farmers are not organized together under one umbrella, and 2) they have neither a leadership structure or the support of policy that will seek the need of farmers in the region. If they were organized, they would be able to share ideas, work with stake holders in addressing some of the challenges they faced with farming. (This includes items like farm to market road, agriculture training, fertilizers, pesticides, seeds, farming materials, tools, marketing of farmers’ products etc, can be to their disposal.)

According to the survey funding, smallholder farmers in the region can’t afford to have an account of extra saving in the bank after selling their products. This means that smallholder farmers used very high labour and low yield to generate the income needed to take care of their family and save some money for the future. They only farm to sustain their household due to inadequate support and sticking to the traditional method of farming.

The findings also indicated that smallholder farmers see the high cost of transportation as an impediment that continues to devalue the price of their products. As long as the farm road to market is inaccessible, the cost of farmers’ agriculture products will be prohibitive to the farmers to the point that profit becomes increasingly difficult. Businessmen and women pay high sums to truck drivers to deliver their goods to market at low prices, allowing farmers to exercise some control over prices. However for the farmers in these communities, those costs are extremely prohibitive.Consequently, there is no practice of price control across Liberia’s agricultural economy.

On top of these concerns, our research also revealed a number of implications for health of the surveyed communities. First among them is the fact that farmers in the communities do not practice birth control. The fact that women don’t exercise their reproductive rights promises to increase poverty among the farming communities because their aggregate income is increasingly insufficient to maintain their rapid increase in family size. Left unmitigated, this means that increased population growth will create poverty among future generations. Additionally, the research indicates that most of the smallholder farmer surfer severe body and back pain, no health facility and save drinking water for women and children. This mean that the health safety of the entire community is at risk. Accordingly if the aforementioned health concerns are not addressed with close attention, citizens may become increasingly vulnerable to lose their lives from ordinary diseases or during emergency cases-or farmers may not get the energy or health support they need for healthy farming in the future.

2.5 Recommendations

The recommendations from this survey didn’t just result from an oversight or a summary of an open observation, but were established based on one on one survey with 36 painstakingly chosen questions with emphasis placed on realistic response from the interviewees. Moreover the survey used a confidential approach that allowed the interviewees to remain comfortable and give truthful answer to the interviewers for a highly effective recommendations. These measures were crucial in facilitating detailed and veracious responses to our questions. Accordingly, the information collected from these detailed conversations put GOLD in an authoritative position to offer the following recommendations:

  1. The survey recommends that the Gbor Clan should establish a farming Union that will develop a unique farming policy through group mobilization and organization al leadership as a way to improve the next generation of farmers in the region.

  2. The survey recommends that farmers should receive a formal agriculture training that will facilitate a shift from subsistence farming to a modern farming method.

  3. The survey recommends that both Bong and Grand Bassa County lawmakers should joint efforts to construct the bridge between Faynutolee, Brong County and District 2 Grand Bassa County.

  4. Given the aforementioned warning signs for future public health concerns in the region, the construction of an emergency Health facility in Ggeah’s Town is highly recommended.

  5. The survey further recommends that local government representatives (Town Chiefs) should be trained in effective leadership methods and advocacy for the needs of the people they represent.

  6. The survey also recommends the development of an effective school system for both early learning and adult literacy.

  7. The survey further recommends the provision of safe drinking water for villagers in Gbeah’s Town and its surrounding villages.

  8. Farmers need to be educated to birth control or women need to exercise their reproductive rights

3.0 Conclusion

The Baseline Survey exercise was an intervention that was financed by the Global Giving fundraising platform. The overarching reason for the necessity of this exercise was for GOLD to develop an effective strategy to implement the Help Farmers Fight Hunger and Child Abuse Project.

After going through a critical research analysis of 1)challenges smallholder farmers faced and 2) what they need to overcome those challenges in Gbeah’s town and its surrounding villages, GOLD is in an authoritative position to develop and implement programming in support of the next generation of smallholder farmers in the entire District 2B.

The research outcome can also be used for future references to researchers, government agencies, and other NGOs who have the passion to improve the lives of smallholder farmers in Liberia. Ultimately, our hope is that this baseline survey will serve as an early catalyst for meaningful and sustainable change for the livelihoods of Liberia’s smallholder farmers.

Summer II Session Courses in the VE/CSU Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

Registration is open for the following courses through July 24th in the VE/CSU online certificate program in Sustainable Community Development. Register now to ensure your seat. Contact info@villageearth.org or discounted rates for NGOs and Government agencies.

APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Course Tuition:  $390
Duration: 5 Weeks
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
July 28 – September 1, 2017 July 24, 2017 Open

Course Description

Explore both the structure and practice of community development around the world.  Engage in a critical analysis of different approaches to community development, their historical development and underlying assumptions.  Gain an understanding of the structural and practical issues that promote or detract from the goal of community empowerment.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Outline  the historical development and underlying assumptions of different approaches to community development.
  • Identify the issues faced by the rapidly changing field of community development.
  • Distill key structures and practices for becoming more effective on the ground.

COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZING

Course Tuition: $390
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
July 28 – September 1, 2017 July 24, 2017 Open

Course Description
The importance of an approach to community-development that increases the rights of poor and marginalized people within governing structures has never been more apparent. Situations of severe oppression and marginalization demand organizing-techniques that go beyond a traditional “hand-out” style approach to development. Taking a practical hands-on perspective, this course will explore the theories, tools, styles and challenges of community-based organizing. It will discuss practical strategies for developing community leadership and working with marginalized communities. Together, we will discover the impact that ordinary individuals can have on the world.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Apply basic organizing techniques, such as popular education and direct action
  • Understand the role of privilege, race, gender and class in struggles for change
  • Understand the history and basic principles of community organizing
  • Design methods to help support and organize the community in which they are working

TOURISM AND DEVELOPMENT

Course Tuition: $390
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
July 28 – September 1, 2017 July 24, 2017 Open

Globally, tourism initiatives receive considerable public funding and private investment as a means of economically developing low-income communities. NGOs are taking on a growing role in local tourism initiatives, as well as voluntourism, in hopes of injecting capital into the communities where they work. Amongst proponents, tourism is seen as a mechanism for local communities to capitalize on assets such as the natural environment and cultural heritage. Yet critiques often note that tourism can be destructive, elite and at times oppressive. In light of this critical lens, we will explore both successful and problematic tourism initiatives. We will critically examine the nature of tourism, its impacts on communities and considerations that must be taken into account in order for a tourism project to have the desired impact of development without destroying.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify best practices for successful tourism initiatives
  • Work with a community to evaluate how tourism may impact their lives
  • Network with private, public and non-profit institutions in the field of tourism and development
  • Understand common challenges and issues with eco-tourism and voluntourism

VE Affiliate, ICA-NEPAL Promoting Menstrual Hygiene with Women and Girls in Nepal

This week, ICA Nepal conducted two programs on Menstrual Hygiene Management with local women from Koteshwor on 25th May, 2017 and women group from Changunarayan on 30th May, 2017 respectively. Marking the International Menstruation Hygiene Management Day on 28th May, 2017, these programs were conducted with the motive on reaching local people and awaring them about menstruation hygiene.

On 25th May, An Interaction Program on Menstrual Hygiene Management was held among local women of Koteshwor, Kathmandu who were mostly social mobilizers and development workers. Total 35 participants participated in the program which was facilitated by Mr. Upendra Dhakal, who worked in the WASH sector for several years.

The program provided very integrated information on menstruation. Starting from the biological process of menstruation, the stages and cycle of menstruation, the program moved ahead with more focus on managing hygienic behaviors. The methods of managing hygiene while using cloth pads or sanitary pads, importance of maintaining personal hygiene as well making hygienic and female friendly toilets were focused. It was asserted that every women should be accessible to clean sanitary napkin materials, clean changing places, regular water, soap and towel and proper disposing facilities.

Several health risks which can occur in the lack of proper hygiene were also shared by the facilitator. Conditions such as vaginal yeast, pubic lice, infection, itchiness and rashes leading upto ovarian and cervical cancer can happen if the hygiene is not maintained properly.

Similarly, the program focused on various challenges women face during menstruation because of the restricitons imposed by the society. Given how taboo is menstruation in eastern societies, there is no proper environment for women to share about their problems easily.

“I was 13 years old when I got my first period. My mother wasn’t at home so I ran away to jungle. I belong to Bajura where i had to stay in Chhaupadi. For coming three years, I experienced Chhaupdi where I had to bath at early 3 am before sun rise”

The program ended with informing participants about some disposing methods of santary materials. Some of the methods are: Burning, Burying, Incinerating and Vermi-composting.

ICA Nepal is planning intensively for taking such programs in various other schools and communities now which we’ll be updating regularly. We would like to heartily thank you all for your donations which made these programs possible. Meanwhile, do continue supporting us. Our new link for fundraising is: https://www.globalgiving.org/microprojects/support-nepali-girls/

The program on 30th May, 2017 was an Interaction Program on Menstrual Hygiene Management which was conducted among local women of Changunarayan. The program was organized by ICA Nepal and facilitated by Ms. Pritha Khanal where 15 women participated.

The program intended on providing Menstrual Hygiene Management knowledge among women who came from one of the commendable women groups of Changunarayan. Thus, them being our stakeholders and not only the beneficiaries, we aimed on providing knowledge about how to enhance Menstrual Hygiene in the community.

In this program also, the need of clean sanitary materials, clean and female friendly toilets, regular water supply, and availability of soap, towel and dustbins in the toilets were highlighted. In addition to this, the facilities of proper disposing should be provided to women where as the different methods of disposing napkins were also shared.

Women should be able to live with dignity and respect during menstruation. The fact that women are treated as impure during menstruation needs to be changed. This message was well conveyed in the program. Participants also shared various challenges they come across during menstruation due to lack of proper facilities to manage their periods.

The program ended with discussion on what can be the role of local women to improve MHM in their communities. They can play the role on personal and on community level. Personally, women can improve on their menstrual health and their families’ health; improve condition of toilets in their houses and offices. On a community level, they can conduct such awareness raising activities among school children and other women; they can prioritize the MHM activities in their women’s group as well.

ICA Nepal is planning intensively for taking such programs in various other schools and communities now which we’ll be updating regularly. We would like to heartily thank you all for your donations which made these programs possible. Meanwhile, do continue supporting us. Our new link for fundraising is: https://www.globalgiving.org/microprojects/support-nepali-girls/

June Courses in the Online Certificate Program in Sustainable Community Development

PARTICIPATORY WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Course Tuition: $390
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
June 9 – July 14, 2017 June 5, 2017 Open

Course Description

Millions in both urban and rural communities worldwide are becoming vulnerable to water scarcity, social exclusion from access to water, polluted water sources and water-borne diseases. Overpopulation, falling groundwater tables, the mismanagement of water sources, pollution and over-extraction all threaten to exacerbate the already severe decline in available water resources. A community-based and participatory approach involving and empowering users and managers of local communities is necessary to balance the various needs and demands on available resources. This course will explore important concepts and strategies for successful participatory water conservation strategies to ensure long-term, sustainable solutions to managing water resources effectively in communities around the world.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Work with communities using tools such as social asset mapping to identify value-based water and sanitation priorities and implement these into their community development plans
  • Deliver training and develop capacity of local communities
  • Understand how to integrate users and managers of local communities, government bodies, and various stakeholders into all components of effective water management plans

Instructor:

Vanitha Sivarajan, M.S.

Vanitha’s background includes over 10 years of conservation and water resource management with local communities, non-governmental organizations, governmental agencies, and the private sector.  She has worked on natural resource management initiatives both domestically and internationally with a focus on Latin America, India, and the U.S. Vanitha’s areas of programmatic knowledge and expertise include climate change adaptation, participatory water resource management, community-based conservation, and international development.  Vanitha holds a Master of Environmental Management degree from Yale University, where she specialized in water science, policy and management.  She was also a William J. Clinton Fellow and holds an undergraduate degree from University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Microbiology and Anthropology.

Currently Vanitha is a Development and Outreach Consultant for Model Forest Policy Program and Wildlands Network where she promotes water resource protection and resilient rural communities from climate impacts as well as connectivity in North America.  She is also the Sustainability Director for World Water Relief, working to ensure the long-term success of water and sanitation projects in the Dominican Republic and Haiti.


MICRO-FINANCE PROJECTS:  SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & THE ROLE OF WOMEN

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units (CEUs): 2
Duration: 5 weeks

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
June 9 – July 14, 2017 June 5, 2017 Open

Course Description

In the context of developing communities across the world, the role of microenterprise is crucial. Identification of people who would undertake micro enterprise is the first important step. Identification of projects to fit the people and their needs and equipping people with the basic skills to run micro-enterprises profitably is the next step in the process. Women-oriented projects are vital as self-esteem building activities for women whose micro enterprises typically, in the long run, produce far reaching economic and social impact for the entire community.

Micro-enterprises have become an important vehicle of development for developing economies. They are small-scale, low-investment projects that provide fulfillment and fairly immediate income generation. This has a great impact on boosting self-confidence which in turn affects family and social life.

Micro enterprises greatly influence the women who, in developing economies, are generally uneducated or semi-educated, are dominated by men, and have relatively low societal status. Micro enterprises energize women to become economically self-sufficient, empower them to be emotionally self-confident, and enable them to have a voice in society. Their newly acquired influence reflects in improved living conditions at home and better prospects for their children’s futures.

Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Explain the role and impacts of micro-finance.
  • Recognize the different types of micro-enterprises: manufacturing, agricultural and non-agricultural based industries, marketing and providing services.
  • Develop a microfinance pilot project.

Instructor:

Kamala Parekh, M.S.

Kamala has a Master’s in Economics from the University of Allahabad, India. Radio Journalism with a BBC affiliated International Broadcasting Company. Community Development Training: Institute of Cultural Affairs-International, Chicago, USA.  Currently she coordinates village and community based activities in Maharashtra, teaches English language to non-English speaking European women in Maharashtra, trains village women and craftsmen in making and marketing local handicrafts in Zambia and India, trains government and private sector multinational organizations and NGOs in the techniques of community development through participative methods, and has coordinated an entrepreneurial development program for village youth in Maharashtra in collaboration with Village Earth.  She also conducts Personality Development Courses for college and university students in India, conducts finishing school courses/women’s empowerment workshops (‘Stree Shakti’) for rural and urban women in India, and holds summer camps for children through non-academic activities to develop their overall personality and build confidence.  Kamala teaches an online course in Microfinance and the Role of Women in Sustainable Community Development.


PARTICIPATORY MONITORING & EVALUATION

Course Tuition:  $390
Continuing Education Units: 2
Duration: 5 weeks

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Next Offered Deadline to Register Registration Status Offered By
June 9 – July 14, 2017 June 5, 2017 Open

Course Description

Discover participatory methods in monitoring and evaluation for community development, where multiple stakeholders are involved in the process of planning, collecting, interpreting, communicating, and using information. Gain skills in using regular monitoring and evaluation processes, which will lead to continuous improvements.

Upon completion of this course participants will be able to:

  • Plan a monitoring and evaluation project
  • Develop evaluation questions that address stakeholders needs
  • Select the most appropriate data collection method for a given situation
  • Effectively communicate monitoring and evaluation data
  • Use the monitoring information for effective feedback and improvement

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation

Pilar Robledo

Pilar is currently Director of Programming and Training for US Peace Corps in Kiev, Ukraine. She’s also serves as Education Cluster Co-lead at UNICEF Pakistan. Previously she’s worked for UNHCR, Save the Children, International Rescue Committee, and IREX. She holds an MPA in Public Administration from University of Colorado, Denver and a BA in Anthropology and Latin American Studies from CU Boulder.